Who To Turn To When You Need Help

Follow

There comes a time when you’re going to need help in life. It could be for any number of reasons and on a spectrum of serious matters. Realize that you don’t need to have all of the answers and tackle your daily obstacles alone.

Reach out when you’re feeling down or would like support. It’s up to you to notify those around you when you’re in need of advice and guidance. Never feel like you’re all alone. There are lots of people out there in your life who can offer assistance. See who to turn to when you need help.

Need help

Parents

Even if you aren’t particularly close with your parents, they’re your parents, and they love you. Open up and tell them when you have an issue on your mind. It may feel awkward at first, but give them a chance and let it play out. Talking to them might help shed more light on what you’re going through. They’re older than you and can offer up advice from experience they’ve had in life. You’re their child, and they want to make sure you’re healthy and happy. Parents have a lot of wisdom to share and might be able to point you in the right direction. It’s at least worth a try, and if they can’t give you what you need at the time, turn to someone else.

Sibling

If you’re lucky enough to have a sibling, ask them if they’d be willing to lend an ear so you can vent. Your brother or sister are blood and don’t want to see you upset. They know you best and understand where you’re coming from on a different level. Even if they live far away, grab the phone and have a conversation with them. You can pick it back up where you left it once you’re together. Never underestimate the connection of two siblings. Remember that they’re always there for you and care about your well-being. Although you may not have spoken in a while, there’s an unbreakable bond that will always exist, so don’t be nervous to reach out.

Friend

Your friends are great companions and a support system you should take advantage of. You’ve laughed, cried and possibly argued, and still, you’re as close as can be. Use your friends as a support system and explain to them what’s going on in your life. Pick one or two friends who’ve always been by your side and know you best. Give them a chance to listen and lend their support to you. Friends aren’t just there in the good times, but the bad times as well. It’s important you’re also that person they can turn to when they’re hurting. It goes both ways. Instead of feeling like a burden, simply understand that this is what friends do for each other.

Counselor

There’s nothing wrong with seeking professional help when you need it. Sometimes it’s necessary and the only answer to getting the comfort you require. They’re trained and ready to listen, so they can get you to a better place. It’s a great outlet for expressing yourself and letting all of your feelings out on the table. You don’t feel judged because the person doesn’t know you and it’s their job to help you. The hardest part is mustering up the courage to make a phone call and schedule an appointment. Think how great you’ll feel after your first meeting and relieved to get your problems off of your chest. You can go as few or as many times as you feel necessary. Try one counselor and if you don’t like them, then switch to another. Go with what makes you feel comfortable.

Lawyer

Another way to seek professional help is to call a lawyer. They’re very helpful when your case is more than you can take on alone. For example, if you get in a car accident, contact attorney Stephen Babcock who specializes in personal injury law and can offer assistance. They understand how a car accident can turn your life upside down and have the knowledge and skills to guide you through the process so you come out on top. They’ll thoroughly investigate and analyze your crash and will represent you in court, if necessary. Lawyers are great resources for sticky situations when you don’t know where to turn. They’re on your side and ready to help you put your life back together.

Boss

If work or home life is bothering you, it may be a good idea to let your boss know, depending on the circumstances. If it’s a workload issue or you’re having trouble with another coworker at the office, tell your boss. Schedule a meeting and discuss the matter professionally. Come with examples and reasons why you’re feeling uncomfortable. If it’s a matter at home and you need special work accommodations, have a conversation with your boss. Know when it’s appropriate to share and when it’s best to use a different outlet to vent. Whatever you do, don’t bottle up the problem and make it worse.

Colleague

If there’s a colleague who you trust and feel comfortable going to with certain issues, then go for it. Talk to them at lunch or head out for a walk and share your concerns with them. Understand who you’re talking to and that you shouldn’t trust everyone. Make a decision how much you’re going to tell them before opening up. Listen to them as well and offer support for their struggles. Help each other to feel better and get back in a positive mindset for going back to work. Be mindful to avoid people and conversations that turn negative and only add fuel to the fire.

Teacher

If you’re in school or graduated and still talk to some of your teachers, they can be excellent resources for you. You’ve spent many hours with them in the classroom, and they understand how you function. Lean on them to offer their support when you’re in the real-world working and living your life and feeling confused. They’ve been down the same road before and are typically very good at providing advice to students and graduates. Let your teachers know what’s going on and let them know what type of advice would help you get through your current situation. Keep in touch and ask your teachers if it’d be okay to contact them in the future.

Coach

Coaches aren’t only there to teach you how to play a sport. They’re there for support and guidance. They care about their players and want to see them succeed. Use your coach as a crutch when you’re seeking advice for any type of problem. Build a relationship with them and be open to sharing information you might normally keep inside. If they’re not the right person to assist you, they’ll let you know and point you in the right direction. Remember that they’re not only a coach, but a mentor and teacher too.

Yourself

Look in the mirror and try to understand yourself better. It’s common to search for answers outside ourselves, but a lot of what we’re seeking comes from within. Make a list of what you want to work on about yourself and set your mind to tackling it. Try taking a cooking class, playing a new sport or running a race. Challenge yourself and build your self-confidence along the way. You have to love yourself before anyone else will, and the only way to do that is to be honest and look in the mirror. Help yourself get to a better place and feel good about who you are before turning to everyone else. It’s difficult in the moment, but ultimately what you have to do to get to a better place. Ask others for input about how you’re doing and what they think of the changes you’ve made. This will help you stay on track.

Online Support

The Internet is filled with personal development and self-help information. Go online and start searching and reading articles that give you the positive momentum you need to keep going strong. Take quizzes, connect with others in chat groups and find resources on social media. This way you can search for what you need in private and focus on you before reaching out to others. Research your issue or topic until you fully understand what it is you need to work through. You’ll realize that someone, somewhere has been through a similar situation and that you’re not alone in your journey. Be a support system for others too and share your input in forums online.

Conclusion

There’s nothing to be ashamed of when you aren’t able to solve a problem on your own. The worst action you can take is doing nothing because it won’t get better on its own. There are lots of people out there who are willing and able to support you. Remember to get to know yourself better and be your own advocate. This is who to turn to when you need help.